Stop Looking

by Rebecca Evans, Hollaback Baltimore Blogger

I know for a fact that I’m not the only person who was offended by
this year’s Super Bowl ads. From the attack (kiss?) of the prom queen,
to GoDaddy’s proclamation that men are brains and women are beauty, my
female friends and I were a little bit thrown off, part puzzled/part
pissed.

We are daily bombarded with the fact that women are defined solely by
their physical characteristics, while men are defined by their
intellect, and if this is the case, can we blame men for thinking
public commentary on these physical characteristics (aka street
harassment) is okay?

It’s not just Super Bowl ads sending this message –It’s headlines in
women’s magazines reading “How To Look Hot in Time For New Year’s,”
while headlines in men’s magazines read: “Everything You Need To Know
About the Current Financial Crisis.”

Some scoff at the superficiality of the advertising world, but here’s
the truth: they have more power in one pinky than activists,
executives and politicians have in an entire hand. They have the power
to subtly (and not so subtly) tell us what to think. If they chose to,
they could create the social change that creates the legislation.

I know street harassment is about domination and not desire, but the
men who let it happen are often unaware of the insult, and with the
entire value of women tied up in makeup, clothing and sex appeal, who
can blame them?

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  1. [...] Baltimore blogger Rebecca Evans posted a blog piece on how advertising dictates our social conversation in public and on the [...]

  2. [...] Baltimore blogger Rebecca Evans posted a blog piece on how advertising dictates our social conversation in public and on the [...]

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