Groping, Stalking

“he had followed me for the last block trying to get my attention” – New story

I was walking from the [coffee store] nearby the Metro station on New York Ave & 9th street headed to work in the morning. I had headphones on listening to music minding my own business. This man touched me to stop me as I was walking into the office building where I work. I freaked because I didn’t know why he was touching me. He claimed he had followed me for the last block trying to get my attention and was wondering if he could talk to me for a minute. I firmly said no and started to walk away but he persisted trying to talk to me. The security officer at the entrance of my job then had to ask him to leave and asked if I was okay.

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Groping

“walked behind me and groped my butt” – Anna’s story

I had just left my apartment and I was on my way to the metro to go out to the county. I was meeting my family for church on my way there at the light/crossing between MLK blvd and Howard street right next to the Cultural center light rail stop I was waiting to cross the street when a man in a gray hoodie walked behind me and groped my butt. I turned around quick he had crossed the street I wanted to go after him and mace him but the only thing I did was quickly walk away in the other direction and cry. I felt so embarrassed and stupid.

I had my phone in my hand I should have taken a picture of the disgusting creep.

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Groping, Leering

“he just grabs my butt” – Rory’s story

I was on a crowded bus, and a really creepy guy was standing behind me. I was about to get off, since it was my stop and he was freaking me out. I take a small step forward and he just grabs my butt and squeezes it. I wasn’t able to ride that bus again for 3 months.

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Assault, Groping

“There were people around. No one tried to help me.” – Abigail’s story

Trigger warning for the following story. If you are ever searching for help after an assault or similar situation, please view our resources page (legal and support).

I was walking to the light rail at 4:30 in the afternoon. A large group of male adolescents were passing as I turned the corner. One of the boys grabbed my ass. I turned and told him he had no right to touch me. Instead of apologizing, another of the boys grabbed my chest and laughed. When I told them that I was going to call the police, proceeded to hold me as they rifled through my pockets, forced me to the ground, called me names, and stole my house keys and phone before running off . There were people around. No one tried to help me. I’ve been mugged before, I don’t care about stolen stuff, but I have to admit being touched against my will has me very upset. I’m not sorry I spoke up, I’m just sorry that these kids are a product of an environment that makes them feel so entitled to another person’s body and things.

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Blocking Path, Groping

“Attempting to grab me by the hips” – phone app submission

Man attempted to block my path on the sidewalk and lunged at me, attempting to grab me by the hips.

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Groping

“I ended up with bruises” – phone app submission

I went to trivia night with my friend and as we were in the second round, 2 guys at the bar (one of which knew my friend) joined us at our table. The other guy (not the one who knew my friend) was high and drunk had his hands all over my legs. I ended up with bruises from the chair as I tried to minimize what all he was able to grab at. I didn’t say anything to my friend until the next day.

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Groping

Groped on the Job – phone app submission

A friend texted to say a customer grabbed her butt at [a discount grocery store] while she was working.

– Julia

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Assault, Blocking Path, Groping, Homophobic, Leering, Lewd Behavior, Positive Thinking, Public Masturbation, Racist, Stalking, Transphobic, Uncategorized, Verbal

Youth Hollaback!

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Thanks to a generous grant from The Pollination Project in 2013, we had the opportunity create a program for middle school kids to address street harassment in an age appropriate way. After months and months of planning, we finally had our first real workshop! Here are some photos of our volunteer Rebecca with the kids at St. Francis Neighborhood Center, the amazing community center in Reservoir Hill. We have worked with them before, taking part in anti-street harassment chalk-walks, and speaking as a Power Player for their Power Project, so piloting our own youth program  at St. Francis was an obvious choice. Over the course of two separate one hour sessions, we spoke to these young folks about ways to make a difference in their communities using art activism. Our tool of choice? Self-decorated t-shirts! (Click here for more photos)

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photo 1Some words from our workshop leader, Rebecca: “We had 8 kids – 5 boys and 3 girls – and had a really active discussion about Street Harassment, Bullying and Art Activism. They were really enthusiastic about the t-shirts and kept talking about the issues while we were working on them.  We also had to extend the discussion to make sure that our t-shirts were non-negative responses which I think is important to add. We had a talk about how sometimes we want to respond aggressively, and it’s OK to feel that,  but aggression and threats were some of the things we put down as Issues on the Street so it’s probably best not to put them on a t-shirt.  I look forward to setting up the next one after Christmas!”

 

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Background: Co-director Shawna took the lead on the Youth Hollaback! project and spoke with many experts on DIY activism, working with youth, art as a tool for social change, and more. She got to interview cool local folks, like Hanna from FORCE, as well as non-Baltimoreans like Tatyana Fazlalizadeh of Stop Telling Women to Smile. While the Pollination Project awarding us the Seed The Change grant made these interviews and practice runs possible, the opportunity to connect with other inspiring folks doing great social justice work has been another surprising benefit to our team personally. We’ve learned a lot, and we’re so happy our volunteer Rebecca will be leading more of these workshops in the future! If you have any interest of bringing our Youth Hollaback! workshop to a group of kids you know, just email us at [email protected]

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Groping

“I was ashamed…then I was angry” – am’s story

A man smacked me on the butt as he passed me when we were crossing the street in opposite directions. He laughed. I hid in [a convenience store] as he and his friend sat outside the [convenience store] on the steps of the Peabody. I waited until they left before I left the [convenience store]. I was ashamed that I was so afraid and then I was really, really angry. I carry pepper spray now.

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Assault, Blocking Path, Groping, Homophobic, Leering, Lewd Behavior, Public Masturbation, Racist, Stalking, Transphobic, Verbal

Surprising statistics for sexual harassment in the workplace

We here at Hollaback! Baltimore love having guest bloggers. It not only allows for a wide range of view points on street harassment, but it helps us show that street harassment is part of the spectrum of gender-based violence, and ties street harassment to other issues faced by women and LGBTQ folks. Here, Alice shares some insight on sexual harassment in the workplace. Thanks, Alice!  – Shawna, co-director, Hollaback! Baltimore

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Sexual harassment in the workplace is a larger issue than some of us might think. While there are only a number of us that have to do with sexual harassment directly or indirectly, it happens in workplaces across multiple industries and with multiple levels of severity around the world. California based sexual harassment attorney Frank Nicholas recently collected research into the issue, and some concerning statistics were found.

When surveyed, men were found to be less aware of various forms of sexual harassment in the workplace over women. Some men show almost 0 levels of awareness in instances where there was ongoing sexual harassment in their workplace whereas women seem to have a greater level of awareness as well as a higher level of reporting.

In recent surveys 54% of people have recorded that they’ve experienced some sort of sexual harassment in the workplace. Now this statistic may seem very high especially if you are used to working in a very safe workplace, but it just goes to show how prevalent this workplace issue can be. 17% of these sexual harassment experiences have been caused by a superior person of power where is 27% of sexual harassment in the workplace occurs from colleagues. In extreme cases, 12% of sexual harassment cases continue when the harassed receive threats of termination by not replying to the requests or ongoing advances of sexual harassment.

21% of the sexual harassment cases in the workplace were reported by men but 79% of sexual harassment in the workplace involves women making them the most targeted gender.

When it comes to age groups, the most commonly sexual harassed employees are between the ages of 21 and 25 with a moderate prevalent between 26 and 30 and the under 20 group being targeted in the third greatest frequency.

Sexual harassment can take on many forms in the workplace including:

Inappropriate touching of the body

Uncomfortable staring at body parts

Uncomfortable comments on physical appearance

Invasion of comfortable space

Using unwelcome or offensive terms or continuously advancing on someone at work.

By knowing the facts and understanding the frequency of sexual harassment you can find the confidence to make changes in your workplace or proper reporting.

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